Suspension, Shocks, and Struts

Your car's suspension and steering system allows your wheels to move independently of the car, while keeping it "suspended" and stable. Any play or uncontrolled motion in these systems results in handling deterioration and accelerated tire wear. Also, your vehicle's alignment affects the condition of the suspension and steering systems. Contact our professional staff today for an inspection, or schedule repairs to your vehicle's suspension and steering system.

Suspension System

Worn or loose components affect the suspension system's ability to control motion and alignment angles, resulting in vehicle handling and stability deterioration, as well as accelerated tire wear. The suspension system includes:

Control arms
Ball joints
Springs (coil or leaf)
Shock absorbers
Struts


Transmission Service

Transmission maintenance leads to a longer vehicle life. Typically trouble with the transmission starts from overheating. Stop-and-go traffic, heavy pulling, struggling in the snow, hot weather, and racing can cause your transmission to overheat. At higher temperatures the transmission fluid burns. Your vehicle loses lubrication and deposits inside the transmission increase. We recommend that you take your vehicle to a service technician as soon as you believe your vehicle is having transmission problems.

To prevent your transmission from damage:

Check your parking space for leaks regularly. If you notice fluid deposits under your car, have one of our technicians inspect it right away.
Check the transmission fluid levels and condition. Change it when necessary.
Make sure you use the correct transmission fluid as specified in your owner's manual.
Make sure to stop your vehicle before shifting into reverse or park.
Always hold the brakes down when shifting from park.

Paying attention to your transmission will help increase the lifespan of your vehicle, save money on costly repairs, ensure smooth shifting, extend your transmission fluid's life, and help prevent leaks.

Exhaust Service

Your exhaust system is more than a muffler. It is a series of pipes that run under your car connecting to your muffler and catalytic converter. The exhaust system controls noise and funnels exhaust fumes away from passengers.

In some ways, your car's exhaust system works like a chimney on a house, directing the byproducts from burning fuel away from the people inside. A car's exhaust system routes waste gases from the engine to the rear of the car, where they are released into the atmosphere. Exhaust gases contain dangerous substances (such as carbon monoxide) and can be hazardous if allowed to flow into your vehicle's cab.

Key components of your exhaust system include:

Exhaust Pipes:

Designed specifically for each model, this pipe is used to properly route exhaust to the back of the vehicle.

Exhaust Manifold:

Acting like a funnel, the exhaust manifold collects the gases from all cylinders and releases them through a single opening. Some engines have two exhaust manifolds.

Catalytic Converter:

The catalytic converter reduces harmful emissions and transforms pollutants into water vapor and other less harmful gases.

Muffler:

The muffler is a metal container with holes, baffles, and chambers that reduces exhaust noise.

Resonator:

The resonator works with the muffler to reduce noise.

Tail Pipe:

Found at the back of the car, the tail pipe carries exhaust gases away from the vehicle.


Automotive Repair Services

Belts & Hoses

Among all the equipment in your vehicle, belts and hoses have the shortest lifespan. These components often crack, leak, or fray due to their constant exposure to heat, vibration, and other harmful chemicals. If not promptly replaced and maintained, it could spell disaster for your vehicle's performance. Belt and hose evaluations based solely on their appearance are not enough. We recommend diligent inspection, and are here to do it. Here is a sample of how we ensure belt and hose quality:

Visual Inspection of Belts

Search for clear indications of damage (cracking, glazing, softening, or peeling)
Test for correct tension
Test for correct alignment
Record belt condition for future reference

Visual Inspection of Hoses

Search for leaks, cracks, hardening, or softening.
Test cooling system for leaks using state-of-the-art pressure technology
Record hose condition for future reference​


TUNE UP


Maximize gas mileage and power, and increase the overall life of your vehicle, with regular tune ups. Tune ups should happen at least every 30,000 miles or every two years, depending on the age and mileage of the car. A tune up makes sure that often overlooked "little things" work correctly and get replaced if needed.

Here is a typical tune-up:

Replace the fuel filter. Filters get clogged with particles and it can decrease the car's efficiency and power.
Change the spark plugs and check the plug wires. Bad plugs or wires lead to mileage inefficiency, loss of power, and rough starts. We'll want to make sure you get new plugs and replace old wires.
Replace distributor cap and rotor. Some cars do not come these items, but if you have them, we can replace them.
Check ignition system and timing. Older vehicles rely on ignition timing.
Make needed adjustments to valves and check/replace gaskets if oil is leaking.
Belts are an important part of the tune up. We check all your belts and replace them if we see signs of wear and tear.



Check Engine Light

Your Check Engine Light or Malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) warns you that your vehicle's computer found a malfunctioning component in your emission control system. You may see "check engine," "service engine soon," or "check powertrain." Or, the light may show an engine picture, perhaps with the word "Check." To determine the actual problem, we use an electronic scan tool or a diagnostic computer to retrieve Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC).


In any case, you should bring your vehicle to us, and we can inspect your vehicle, diagnose the problem, and take care of it. Leaving your engine light on can cause serious problems with your car in the long run.


Scheduled Maintenance

Ensure maximum miles without major break-downs with routine car maintenance at 30,000, 60,000, and 90,000 miles. Scheduled maintenance allows us to do a point-by-point vehicle inspection, tune-up (spark plugs, filters, etc.), oil change, and transmission maintenance. Depending on your miles and the vehicle, we may change belts, re-time your vehicle, and test the battery.



​AC SERVICE

Did you know that without regular maintenance an air conditioner loses about 5% of its original efficiency per year? This means that without proper maintenance, your air conditioning system  may be performing as poorly as other models that are years older! But there is good news; you can still recover most of that lost efficiency. Schedule an appointment with one of our trained professionals—we understand all aspects of AC repair, from modern computerized components to environmental disposal concerns. Turn to us, your qualified source for everything related to your air conditioning system. 


Fuel System Service

Are you seeing problems with your vehicle like:

Reduced fuel economy
Rough idling
Hesitation when accelerating
Engine knocking
A sticking throttle pedal
Cold-start problems
Failed emission testing

If so, your fuel system may be worn out or dirty. Your vehicle's fuel system must be maintained to perform efficiently and keep emissions low. In many cases, your fuel system clogs as it wears out. Fuel filter clogs often occur because they trap dirt, water, and other contaminants which cause stress to the fuel pump. That is why we suggest you replace your worn out filters every 15,000 to 30,000 miles. Bring in your vehicle and we'll remove your old fuel filter and replace it with a new one. As for dirty fuel systems, our professionals will clean them.

Our Fuel Service cleaning includes:

Cleaning deposits from fuel injectors
Clear intake valves of deposit buildup
Remove hard-to-remove deposits from the combustion chamber
Clear deposits from the air intake (including throttle body and intake manifold)Type your paragraph here.

​ALIGNMENTS

Driving without proper alignment costs you money. Not only does flawed alignment decrease gas mileage and tire life, but it also adds stress to your vehicle's steering equipment and structure. Ideally, your vehicle's wheels should run perpendicular to the ground and parallel to each other. Adjusting these wheel angles will bring your vehicle back into proper alignment.

Driving without proper alignment puts you at risk. An out-of-alignment car pulls and drifts away from a straight road and may cause an accident. Excessive tire wear—another result of bad car alignment—leads to tire blow-outs and poor traction, which also causes accidents. Bring in your vehicle and our alignment experts will make sure your vehicle drives smoothly and safely.


​          636-671-1333  

4525 GRAVOIS RD HOUSE SPRINGS MO 63051   

Brake Service


Our ASE-certified technicians take professionalism to the next level by offering courteous and knowledgeable service to all of our customers. Continually striving to master every aspect of automotive care, ASE technicians follow Motorist Assurance Program Uniform Inspection Guidelines for your vehicle's braking system to assure safe, smooth driving.


Disc Brakes:
Disc brake rotors and pads
Calipers and hardware

Drum Brakes:
Brake drums and shoes
Wheel cylinders
Return springs

Parking Brake:
Cables


Radiators

The Coolant Process:

Ethylene glycol, better known as anti-freeze, is the neon green liquid that flows from your engine and then through your radiator to cool it. The liquid is able to cool by passing through tubes inside of the radiator. As the liquid passes through these tubes, the heat from the liquid is displaced by the tubes and small "fins" connecting the tubes of the radiator. The liquid flows through these fins and tubes and the surrounding air is warmed by the displacement of heat. The liquid's heat is lost by allowing the radiator's assembly to "radiate" the heat caused by the liquid into the air. A fan pushes that hot air away from the radiator. Air heats up fast, so replacing the warm air around the radiator with cool air is extremely important. When the coolant finally exits the tube and fin assembly of the radiator, it has been sufficiently cooled and passes through the engine again.

Why should I fix a leak in my radiator?

The first thing that our team of professionals will tell you is that it is best to keep your engine running cool as to allow the engine to run more cleanly and efficiently. This in turn will allow your engine to last as long as possible and keep it safe from abnormal wear and tear. If that leak is not fixed properly as soon as possible, your engine may overheat causing very costly damage including:

A blown out top header
Destruction of your radiator entirely
Cracking or blowing out the engine's head gasket
Total engine seizure


General Repair

Having issues with your vehicle? Bring it by our shop as soon as possible and we will diagnose the problem(s) for you. We have a wide range of services and carry top-of-the-line products to accompany them. Our skilled employees will provide you with full service and quality repairs for all your vehicle needs.

Give us a call or email us today.Type your paragraph here.

CV and Drive Axles

Your vehicle's axle connects two wheels together in front and in back. This load-bearing component acts like a central shaft, maintaining the wheel positions relative to each other and to the vehicle body. The axle construction matches vehicle use; trucks and off-road vehicles come with axles that keep the wheel positions steady under heavy stress (ideal for supporting heavy loads), while conventional axles satisfy general consumer needs. No matter what you drive, remember that your vehicle's axle must bear the weight of your vehicle (plus any cargo) along with the acceleration forces between you and the ground. When it comes to axle inspection, we are your source for professional, knowledgeable service. Bring your car to us and rest assured that the equipment that carries you and your family is safe and secure.

Here is a brief description of the most common axle design:

Drive/CV Axle:

Simply put, the engine drives the axle. Typically found in front wheel drive vehicles, a drive axle is split between two half axles with differential and universal joints between them. Each half axle connects to the wheel by a third joint—the constant velocity (CV) joint—that allows the wheels to move freely. This joint allows the shaft to rotate, transmitting power at a constant speed without a significant increase in friction and heat. CV joints require regular inspection.




BATTERY AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

Let's face it: you can have the most meticulously maintained vehicle on the road, but it won't start without the right battery – properly installed and appropriately fitted – for your driving needs. From ignition to door locks, your car battery allows you to get from point "A" to point "B."

Battery

Composed of a series of lead plates submerged in a 35% sulfuric acid/65% water solution, your 12-volt battery houses a chemical reaction that releases electrons through conductors, producing electricity which is then channeled into your vehicle's electrical system. The battery supplies electricity to all of the electrical system components, including the essential power required to start your vehicle. In periods of high demand, the battery also supplements power from the charging system.

Charging System

The charging system is the life force of your vehicle's electrical system, consisting of three main mechanisms: the alternator, various circuits, and the voltage regulator. The alternator:

Provides power to the electrical system, and
Recharges the battery when the car is running.


Starting System

It may seem obvious that the starting system turns your vehicle's engine on, but did you know that this process consumes more electrical power than anything else your car does? The starting system consists of three components working one after another. These components include: the ignition switch, the starter relay (or solenoid), and the starter motor.

Here's how it works:

Turning the ignition causes a small amount of current to pass through the starter relay, causing a stronger current to flow through the battery cables and into the starter motor. The starter motor cranks the engine, forcing the piston to create enough suction that draws a fuel and air mixture into the cylinder. The ignition system creates a spark that ignites the mixture and your engine starts.